Antioxidant SOD1 puts up fight, loses battle against toxic tau protein linked to Alzheimer’s disease

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New research may explain why an antioxidant that protects the brain is also associated with deterioration in areas susceptible to Alzheimer’s disease. The antioxidant, superoxide dismutase or SOD1, improves cognition, but an Iowa State University research team found SOD1’s protective benefits dramatically weaken when levels of tau proteins – a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease – increase.

Tera Jordan’s article on declining divorce rate published by The Conversation

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Tera Jordan, associate professor in HDFS, wrote an article published by The Conversation about the decreasing rate of divorce in the U.S.

Iowa State University joins Carnegie Project to transform education doctorate

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The Iowa State University School of Education has joined the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate, a consortium of leading universities that are working together to improve professional preparation in education at the highest level.

SPIT lab continues to expand research on puberty, hair analysis

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The Stress Physiological Investigative Team (SPIT) Laboratory is working to develop an understanding of the changes that occur during puberty, as well as reasons why there is a lack of research on puberty in understudied populations.

Moderate muscle strength shows decreased risk for type 2 diabetes, research shows

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A recent research study by DC Lee, associate professor of kinesiology, shows that moderate muscle strength can lead to decreased risk for type 2 diabetes in adults.

Alumnus Michael Nettles receives award from Diverse: Issues in Higher Education magazine

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Iowa State University alumnus Michael Nettles has received the Dr. John Hope Franklin Award from Diverse: Issues in Higher Education magazine. Nettles is senior vice president and the Edmund W. Gordon Chair of the Educational Testing Service's Policy Evaluation and Research Center.

Giving high school students the tools to question classic literature

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Generations of students have read Shakespeare and Hemingway for high school literature class and Jeanne Dyches, assistant professor in Iowa State University’s School of Education, would like students to question that tradition. Assigning these texts without questioning issues of race or gender may exclude students who do not see themselves in the text, and make them feel their voices are not valued, she said.

Brian Burt cited as Emerging Scholar by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education

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Brian Burt, an assistant professor in the School of Education at Iowa State University, has been named an Emerging Scholar, a distinction bestowed by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education magazine, for his research to improve the experience of Black men in STEM programs and graduate students in education.

School of Education scholars continue tradition of academic excellence

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This November, Iowa State University School of Education graduate students and faculty members will present at the Association for the Study of Higher Education’s (ASHE) annual conference in Tampa, Florida.

Singing may reduce stress, improve motor function for people with Parkinson’s disease

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In a recent study done by Iowa State researchers, singing has been found to reduce stress and improve motor function in people with Parkinson's disease. While it is "preliminary data," the study shows that the improvements among participants are similar to improvements made from taking medicine.