College of Human Sciences

Weightlifting is good for your heart and it doesn’t take much

Lifting weights for less than an hour a week may reduce your risk for a heart attack or stroke by 40 to 70 percent, according to a new study led by DC (Duck-chul) Lee, an Iowa State University associate professor in kinesiology.  

"People may think they need to spend a lot of time lifting weights, but just two sets of bench presses that take less than 5 minutes could be effective," Lee said.

Spending more than an hour in the weight room did not yield any additional benefit, the researchers found.

Read full story on the ISU News Service website.

 

School of Education scholars continue tradition of academic excellence

On November 15-17, Iowa State University School of Education graduate students and faculty members will present at the Association for the Study of Higher Education’s (ASHE) annual conference in Tampa, Florida. Presentations will cover topics from developing community colleges in India to supporting disabled students living on campus.

Lorenzo Baber, associate professor and head of the School of Education’s higher education division, commented on the faculty’s widespread topics relating to post-secondary education policy and students of different demographics.

“We have national experts in student development, policy development, community colleges, theoretical frameworks around equity and social justice — obviously as you can see with the presentations at ASHE, they run the gambit for those areas.”

Equity and social justice provide the central theme that connects all of the presentations.

“The common thread is around equity, access, and improving practice and policies around education,” Baber said.

At the conference there will be 22 presentations delivered by Iowa State University scholars. Baber is excited about more than just the large number.

“What I’m proud of most is not just the number of presentations, but the quality and the quality across different topics. The quality of our presentations are strong.”

“These are all peer reviewed conference presentations, so we’ve gone through the system and our peers have deemed our scholarship as worthy of being presented at this conference. It amplifies the program, it amplifies the faculty, but also amplifies the students.”

Representing the program will be a tall task, as the School of Education has a strong tradition of excellence when it comes to higher education.

“Iowa State has a long standing reputation in higher education… we’re just an extension of that,” Baber said.

Baber has complete confidence in his coworkers’ ability to continue that tradition of excellence.

“It’s a great responsibility to carry that tradition, but I think we’re rising and living up to that tradition.”


Here are the Iowa State-led presentations that will be given at the conference:

Understanding and Exploring International Student Development
Wed, November 14, 3-4:15 p.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Second, Grand Salon E
Sense of Belonging among International Students: Testing a Multigroup based Structural Model — 
Authors: Linda Hagedorn, Iowa State University; Anupma Singh, Iowa State University

CEP Roundtable Session
Thu, November 15, 8-9:00 a.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Second, Florida Salon VI
Making It Rain…Tears: The Struggles in Balancing Large-scale, Interdisciplinary Grants and One’s Own Research Agenda — Authors: Erin Doran, Iowa State University; Sarah Rodriguez, Iowa State University

CIHE Poster and Roundtable Session
Thu, November 15, 9:15-10:30 a.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Second, Grand Salon C
Sense of Belonging of International Students: A Critical Review — Author: Anupma Singh, Iowa State University

CIHE Poster and Roundtable Session
Thu, November 15, 9:15-10:30 a.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Second, Grand Salon C
Development of Community Colleges in India: A Case Study — Author: Anupma Singh, Iowa State University

STEM Students: Influences of Pedagogy, Early Programming, and Transfer Practices
Thu, November 15, 12:45-2:00 p.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Second, Meeting Room 6
Inclusion & Marginalization: How Perceptions of Design Thinking Pedagogy Influence Computer, Electrical, and Software Engineering Identity — Authors: Sarah Rodriguez, Iowa State University; Erin Doran, Iowa State University; Elizabeth Martinez-Podolsky, Iowa State University; Paul Hengesteg, Iowa State University

A Woke Academy Teach-in: Toward More Critically Conscious Teaching and Curricula in Higher Education Programs
Thu, November 15, 12:45-2:00 p.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Second, Grand Salons AB
Participant: Rosemary Perez, Iowa State University

Catching the Spirit: A Discussion on the Role of Spirituality and Diversity in the Experiences of STEM Students
Thu, November 15, 2:15-3:30 p.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Second, Florida Salon VI
Presenters: Brian Burt, Iowa State University; Sarah Rodriguez, Iowa State University

Fostering Postsecondary Pathways in PK-12 for Latina/o/x Students: Toward Intersectionality and Contextualizing College Access and Choice
Fri, November 16, 8:00-9:15 a.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Second, Florida Salon VI
Presenter: Janette Mariscal, Iowa State University

Navigating Sexual and Gender Identity Development on Campus
Fri, November 16, 8:00-9:15 a.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Third, Meeting Room 10
Exploring How Gay Latinx Men Use Emotion Regulation to Overcome Academic and Personal Obstacles — Author: Sarah Rodriguez, Iowa State University

General Conference Roundtable Session
Fri, November 16, 10:45-11:30 a.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Second, Grand Salons F-J
Measuring the Campus Climate for Contributing to A Larger Community — Authors: Kevin Hemer, Iowa State University; Robert Reason, Iowa State University

Power and Privilege: Transforming Faculty Practice
Fri, November 16, 12:15-1:30 p.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Second, Florida Salons I-II
Advocating for Ethnic Studies in Whitestream Community Colleges: A Focus on Faculty Efforts — Authors: Erin Doran, Iowa State University; Paul Hengesteg, Iowa State University

Conducting High-Quality Longitudinal Studies on College Student Experiences and Development
Fri, November 16, 12:15-1:30 p.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Second, Florida Salon IV
Presenter: Rosemary Perez, Iowa State University

Research and Theory on Women of Color in STEM: Envisioning a Woke Agenda for STEM Equity
Fri, November 16, 1:45-3:00 p.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Second, Florida Salon VI
Presenter: Sarah Rodriguez, Iowa State University

Frameworks for Realizing a Woke Academy
Fri, November 16, 3:15-4:30 p.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Second, Grand Salon C
A Framework for Inclusive Data Justice and Care for Learning Analytics Use in Higher Education — Author: Michael Brown, Iowa State University

Making Meaning of the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election: Qualitative Research on Campuses in the Era of 45
Fri, November 16, 3:15-4:30 p.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Second, Florida Salon V
Organizer: Rosemary Perez, Iowa State University

College Students' Experiences of Intercultural and Civic Engagement
Sat, November 17, 10:30-11:40 a.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Second, Meeting Room 4
Civic Engagement at Community Colleges: Understanding the relationship between individual, institutional, and political environments on civic engagement — Author: Michael Brown, Iowa State University

(Re)Thinking The Notions Surrounding Student Success While (Re)Centering Queer, (Dis)Abled, & Students Of Color
Sat, November 17, 10:30-11:40 a.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Third, Meeting Room 9
Integration and Success: Disabled Students Living on Campus — Author: Nancy Evans, Iowa State University

Participatory Action Research and Community-Based Research as “Woke” Methodologies in Higher Education Scholarship
Sat, November 17, 10:30-11:40 a.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Second, Florida Salon IV
Presenter: Janette Mariscal, Iowa State University

Socialization Experiences Among Graduate and Doctoral Students
Sat, November 17, 1:30-2:45 p.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Second, Grand Salon G
Exploring Meaning-Making Patterns in Graduate Students' Socialization to Social, Disciplinary, and Professional Identities — Authors: Rosemary Perez, Iowa State University; L. Wesley Harris Jr., Iowa State University

Exploring The Diverse Experiences of Black Collegians
Sat, November 17, 3:00-4:15 p.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Third, Meeting Room 11
Discussant: Brian Burt, Iowa State University

Reimagining Diversity Policy and Practice
Sat, November 17, 3:00-4:15 p.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Second, Grand Salon D
Professing Equity and Inclusion: A Content Analysis of Diversity Statements, Policies, and Requirements at Land-Grant Institutions — Author: Erin Doran, Iowa State University

Identity, Expectations, and Lived Experiences in Graduate and Doctoral Education
Sat, November 17, 3:00-4:15 p.m., Tampa Marriott Waterside, Second, Meeting Room 4
My Brilliant?, Classed, Raced, and Gendered Academic Career: Challenging Master Narratives of the Ideal Doctoral Student and Work — Author: Janette Mariscal, Iowa State University

 

Singing may reduce stress, improve motor function for people with Parkinson’s disease

The results from a recent pilot study done by Iowa State researchers shows that singing may lead to improvements in mood and motor function for people with Parkinson's disease. While the data is only preliminary, assistant professor of kinesiology Elizabeth Stegemöller says that the improvements made from singing are similar to improvements made when taking medication. 

The study, conducted by Stegemöller, Elizabeth "Birdie" Shirtcliff, associate professor of human development and family studies, and graduate student in kinesiology Andrew Zaman, is one of the first to examine how singing affects heart rate, blood pressure, and cortisol levels in people with Parkinson's. The heart rate, blood pressure, and cortisol levels of 17 participants were taken before the singing session, and participants expressed feelings of sadness, anxiety, happiness, and anger. After the singing session, all three levels were reduced. 

Read the full story from the ISU News Service here. 

 

Study to explore how cognitive development affects later attitudes toward physical activity

Iowa State researchers are working to understand the connection between childhood cognitive development and attitudes toward physical activity. Kinesiology professor Panteleimon "Paddy" Ekkekakis and graduate student Matthew Ladwig believe that the prefrontal cortex, the area of the brain that controls emotions, may play a role. 

The prefrontal cortex not only controls emotions, but pushes people to their maximum effort and controls how adults feel about exercising. Since this region is not fully developed in children, it may more difficult for them to control their emotions, and thus have a negative view of exercise, especially if it is difficult. 

Read the complete story by the ISU News Service. 

Reason named interim associate dean of the College of Human Sciences

Robert Reason, professor and associate director for research and administration in the School of Education at Iowa State University, has been named interim associate dean for undergraduate academic affairs in the College of Human Sciences. The appointment runs from September 24, 2018 through June 30, 2019.

Hydration strategy key as high school athletes begin practice

The first week of high school sports practices is a particularly vulnerable time for athletes, says an Iowa State University assistant professor of kinesiology. James Lang studies how environmental stresses, such as heat, affect how our bodies regulate internal temperature.

Lang says being proactive about hydration, rather than reactive, is important to keep athletes safe. He has the following recommendations for coaches and athletes:

See the complete story by the ISU News Service.

 

Sellers reappointed human sciences associate dean and Human Sciences Extension and Outreach director

Debra Sellers has been reappointed to serve another five-year term as director of Human Sciences Extension and Outreach and associate dean in the College of Human Sciences. She has served Iowa State University in these capacities since July 2013.

Oscar-nominated costume designer Ruth E. Carter to lecture at Iowa State

Costume designer Ruth E. Carter has more than 40 design credits to her name - the most recent being Marvel's "Black Panther." On Oct. 9, Carter will bring her story, expertise, and vision to Iowa State during her lecture, "A Hollywood Career in Costume Design." The lecture will be held at Stephens Auditorium, and is free and open to the public. Lecture attendees are encouraged to enter Stephens through the west or east door.

Carter has worked in the industry for more than three decade, and is the first African-American costume designer to be nominated for an Academy Award. She is know for her work on period ensemble films, and some of her design credits include Spike Lee's "Malcolm X," Steven Spielberg's "Amistad," and Ava Duvernay's "Selma." 

See the complete story by the ISU News Service. 

Human Development and Family Studies chair Carl Weems named APS fellow

An Iowa State University researcher with expertise in traumatic stress, emotional development, and the intervention and prevention of emotion-related difficulties has joined an elite group of researchers in the field of psychology. Carl Weems, professor and chair of human development and family studies, has been named a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science. Fellow status in APS cites Weems for “sustained and outstanding contributions to the advancement of psychological science.”

Weems is a developmental psychologist who applies science to solve real-world problems and improve the human condition. His research has focused on how severe and traumatic stress affects brain development and how to prevent the negative effects of adverse stress in children and youth so they maintain healthy regulation of their emotions and optimum wellness.

Part of his work is exploring the amygdalae and hippocampus — groups of nuclei located within the temporal lobes of the brain that are important to emotion and memory. He is examining how traumatic experiences effect these areas and their interrelation to brain networks involved in detection of salient stimuli, decision making, and emotion regulation. A review and theoretical model of this work is slated to appear in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry in 2019.

He is currently working with several Iowa State University colleagues in Human Sciences Extension and Outreach and the Translational Research Network to develop a statewide workshop to actualize trauma-informed practices in the state — including dissemination of intervention techniques that professionals can use to promote resilience in people who have experienced trauma. As the principal investigator of the Child Welfare Research and Training Project, Weems helps lead the development of trauma-informed trainings for Iowa Department of Human Services employees and the deployment of efforts aimed at reducing the incidence and impact of traumatic events such as domestic violence.

Among his recently completed projects is a study funded by the National Science Foundation that integrates cognitive emotional development and computer science to improve cybersecurity. The study examines how emotions, personality, and cognitive styles may help in the detection and prevention of cyber risk — the financial loss, disruption, or damage to the reputation of an organization resulting from a failure of its information systems.

In another paper recently published by the Applied Developmental Science journal, Weems and his colleagues evaluated perceptions of competence and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder in children and teens exposed to hurricanes Katrina and Gustav and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. They found that children with higher levels of competence were overall more resilient and had fewer symptoms of post-traumatic symptoms disorder.

The Association for Psychological Science is the leading international organization dedicated to advancing scientific psychology across disciplinary and geographic borders.

Closing of department, big box stores ushers in new opportunities for retail

Despite the closure of department and big box stores, researchers from the AESHM department found that not all retailers are destined for the same fate. 

Linda Niehm, Telin “Doreen” Chung, and Jessica Hurst found that despite a changing retail landscape, stores that are willing to embrace technological changes can create a different shopping experiences for their consumers. 

"What we’re seeing is in part a natural evolution of the retail cycle, and old formats are replaced with something more relevant,” Niehm said. “It’s really a transitional time and the retail industry is still figuring it out. Retail is a dynamic industry and it will continue to thrive, but the bar has been raised and consumers expect more, not the same old tired stuff.”