Sixty-seven school districts sought out job candidates at the Teacher Education Career Fair held in the Iowa State University Alumni Center, March 4.

Teacher Education Career Fair at Iowa State University connects students with future employers

Three hundred education students explored career opportunities — and 67 school districts sought out job candidates — at the Teacher Education Career Fair held at Iowa State University on March 4.

The growing attendance was apparent on every floor of the Iowa State Alumni Center, with streams of students connecting with prospective employers.

"We received really positive feedback in conversations with school district personnel," said Jaime Boeckman, director of ISU Teacher Education Services, which teamed up with the College of Human Sciences Career Services staff to coordinate the fair. "Our staffs did a tremendous job of putting the event together and supporting everyone who attended."

Besides exploring their job options, student attendees, including those who are student teaching this spring, learned more about career development. Attendees polished their skills in mock interviews and received interviewing tips and advice from successful peers. They also learned the ins and outs of signing a contract and obtaining a teacher license.

"It definitely reflects positively on our students to see this high level of engagement for the Teacher Education Career Fair," said Tammy Stegman, director of CHS Career Services. "While a majority of those in attendance were ready to enter the job market soon, close to 20 percent of the attendees were underclassman. This shows a genuine interest in learning about career opportunities — which is exactly what we want to happen."

Instead of hosting a separate career fair this year, Heartland Area Education Agency partnered with Iowa State to enhance the fair. Heartland professionals offered a workshop on leveraging AEA resources to improve learning in the future educators' classrooms.

"We are proud to partner with Heartland to better serve the needs of future teachers and schools," Boeckman said.